Simulation and Skills

Guidance information that is aimed at Registered Practitioners who are Practice Assessors & Practice Educators

The skills and practice elements that are taught are drawn from the NMC Annexe A & B (NMC, Standards for pre-registration nursing programmes, 2018) and the Pre-registration Midwifery standards (2009).

About the Sheila Scott building

The Shelia Scott Building is a dedicated learning environment for clinical skills and practice teaching and simulation. Skills teaching can range from simple instructional lessons for instance injection techniques to more complex simulation. Simulation draws on a series of scenarios to elicit a range of responses that include observation, communication and assessment, planning and delivering care or a very specific intervention for instance using an AED.

The skills and practice elements that are taught are drawn from the NMC Annexe A & B (NMC, Standards for pre-registration nursing programmes, 2018) and are those skills that students are likely to meet and use in practice currently and that students can perform and be assessed on, by Practice Assessors. The scope and range of skills will continue to grow as Academic and Practice Assessors become more familiar with the new NMC standards.

 

Equipment and kit

As far as possible the equipment that we use in skills, practice and simulation teaching replicates that found in the clinical environment; however as we work with a wide range of different practice partners across acute and community trusts and a wide variety of private care providers, we cannot guarantee that it will be the same as that found in the clinical placement areas.

Students are always taught the core principles that apply to all equipment for a given procedure, however it remains the practice partner’s responsibility to ensure that students receive training in equipment specific to that placement area or trust.

For instance, with blood glucose measurement there are a wide range of different glucometers available in trusts or that the patient themselves may provide. Students are therefore taught principles around where to take a blood droplet sample, how to maintain universal precautions, safe disposal of sharps and interpreting the results among others.

If you have some new equipment that is being brought into regular use across your placement areas, please let us know so that we can consider adding it to our equipment to maintain these links.

 

Skills and Practice Procedures

All skills, practice and simulation training is delivered using current best practice standards and will follow national guidelines, algorithms and evidence based practice as required. ClinicalSkills.net and The Royal Marsden Manual of Clinical Procedures are used for reference. When local policies and procedures are updated or changed we ensure that this is reflected in the teaching that is delivered, for instance the ReSPECT process for DNACPR is now being taught.

If you have some new or changing policies / procedures that are being brought into regular use across your placement areas, please let us know so that we can consider adding it to our skills and simulation training to maintain these links.