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What makes our Teaching and Learning Support FdA special?*

For many young people, learning support assistants are an essential part of their educational journey. The role requires patience and integrity and brings with it considerable responsibilities and substantial rewards.

The Teaching and Learning Support FdA is designed for individuals who are currently working or volunteering within primary or secondary schools. It aims to draw upon your existing knowledge and experience, and to support you to develop new skills and knowledge. With an emphasis on work-based assignments, your learning is orientated around your practical experience. The aim of this course is to further your personal and professional development and open the door to possible additional study and routes into teaching.

The course is timetabled over a single day in each teaching block to enable students to easily fit studying around their work commitments.

*Subject to approval

Overview

Overview

Key features

  • Flexible locations: study at either University of Worcester, Herefordshire and Ludlow College or at Halesowen College on a full or part-time basis
  • An ideal opportunity to study whilst employed, delivery of this course is designed to work around your employment. Teaching takes place on a single day in each teaching block to simplify time management around work and other responsibilities.

  • Top up opportunities at the University of Worcester, including our BA Education Studies and BA (Hons) Teaching in Primary Education with recommendation for Qualified Teacher Status (Top Up) programmes: Early Years (3-7) or Later Years (5-11)
  • A route into teaching; upon successful completion of your foundation degree you are guaranteed an interview for the Teaching in Primary Education BA (Hons) with QTS Top Up.
  • Support your professional development by exploring topics as diverse as the curriculum, managing challenging behaviour, inclusive education and exploring children’s mental health and wellbeing.

Entry requirements

What qualifications will you need?

32
UCAS tariff points

Entry requirements

32 UCAS Tariff points, plus current/recent experience of working with learners, a minimum of two years experience employed or working in a voluntary capacity within an appropriate educational setting is desirable.

  • The normal minimum entry requirement for Foundation Degree courses is the possession of 4 GCSEs (Grade C/4 or above) and 1 A Level (or equivalent Level 3 qualification).
  • Key skills at Level 3 may be allowed to contribute to up to 20 UCAS tariff points towards meeting the condition of an offer, until they are removed from the UCAS Tariff. These Skills do not satisfy the subject knowledge requirements for courses requiring specific GCSE subjects.
  • Details of acceptable level 3 qualifications, policy in relation to mature students or applicants with few or no formal qualifications can be found in the prospectus or on the University webpages. See the University’s Admissions Policy for other acceptable qualifications and the section below specific to recognition of prior learning.
  • Candidates with non-standard entry applications will be considered on the basis of relevant work experience and attainment of skills. They will be invited to complete a 500-word written assignment, which will reflect capacity to study at this level.

Other information

  • Applicants are interviewed and invited to share their experience of working with learners. A minimum of two years' experience employed or working in a voluntary capacity within an appropriate educational setting is desirable.
  • An Enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service Check is required for this course.

If you have any questions about entry requirements, please contact the Admissions Office on 01905 855111 or email admissions@worc.ac.uk for advice.

Further information about the UCAS Tariff can be obtained from the UCAS website.

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Course content

What will you study?

Our courses are informed by research and current developments in the discipline and feedback from students, external examiners and employers. Modules do therefore change periodically in the interests of keeping the course relevant and reflecting best practice. The most up-to-date information will be available to you once you have accepted a place and registered for the course. If there are insufficient numbers of students interested in an optional module, this might not be offered, but we will advise you as soon as possible and help you choose an alternative. 

Delivery of this course is over 1 day (afternoon / evening) per week in term time.

Level 4

Mandatory

  • Preparing for Study
  • Enhancing subject knowledge and pedagogies in literacy and numeracy in the workplace
  • Child Development and Positive Climates for Learning
  • Understanding Learning Support
  • Partnerships in Education
  • Understanding Assessment

Level 5

Mandatory

  • Introduction to Research Methods
  • Inclusion in Theory and Practice
  • Work Based Research Project
  • Understanding Curriculum
  • Supporting Additional Needs and Mental Health, Resilience and Wellbeing in Education
  • Evaluation and Change in Education
  • An Introduction to Social Care Strategies: Meeting the National Agenda
Teaching and assessment

How will you be taught?

The University places emphasis on enabling students to develop the independent learning capabilities that will equip you for lifelong learning and future employment, as well as academic achievement. A mixture of independent study, teaching and academic support through the personal academic tutoring system enables you to reflect on progress and build up a profile of skills, achievements and experiences that will enable you to flourish and be successful.

Teaching

You will be taught through a combination of modules, which work towards student independence. Within the practical-based modules, this is achieved through work related assignments and a programme that gradually transfers responsibility for learning to you as the student. Learning occurs in a context that enables you to relate what you are learning to what you already know and to guide you through subsequent general reading. The source material in these modules is not confined to lectures but includes a range of appropriate strategies such as structured and general reading, video material, observation, experiential learning.

In addition, meetings with personal academic tutors are scheduled on at least 4 occasions in the first year and three occasions in each of the other years of a course.

You will have an opportunity to engage with learning through a comprehensive range of learning and teaching strategies which include:

  • Lectures
  • Workshops
  • Seminars
  • Group Work
  • Practical activities
  • Problem-based learning

Work-based activities and assignments will enable you to engage with your own practice and to share your knowledge and expertise with others. You will also undertake a work-based study in your second year, which allows you, with tutorial support, to focus on a particular area of interest within your professional practice.

Lectures enable the delivery of theory while seminars and workshops provide a space for the discussion and development of understanding. Practical activities and problem-based learning will form part of your teaching so that you can link theory to practice within schools to support you as a practitioner now and in future careers.

The University places emphasis on enabling you to develop the independent learning capabilities that will equip you for lifelong learning and future employment, as well as academic achievement. A mixture of independent study, teaching and academic support from Student Services and Library Services, and also the personal academic tutoring system enables you to reflect on progress and build up a profile of skills, achievements and experiences that will enable you to flourish and be successful.

Contact time

In a typical week you will have between 4 and 6 hours of teaching. The precise contact hours may vary by semester (1 afternoon and 1 evening). Typically contact time will be structured around:

  • 2 - 3 hours of lectures
  • 2 - 3 hours of seminars/workshops/practical activities in groups of around 20 students

Independent self-study

In addition to the contact time, you are expected to undertake around 16 hours of personal self-study per week. Typically, this will involve directed study tasks, academic reading, reflection on module ideas, and applying knowledge to your professional role.

Work-based learning is an embedded element of the course. Modules are assessed through work related learning and it is a requirement that students are employed or volunteer in a learning support or similar role for the duration of the course. You are expected to undertake this work-based learning for a minimum of two days a week. This enables students to relate their studies to their own setting and context.

A range of excellent learning facilities, including the Hive and library resources, the virtual learning environment, and extensive electronic learning resources, supports independent learning.

Timetables and Duration

Timetables are normally available one month before registration. Please note that whilst we try to be as student friendly as possible, scheduled teaching can take place on any day of the week; and some classes can be scheduled in the evenings. Teaching for this course will be scheduled across one afternoon/evening per teaching block to support students to study around their employment.

Course duration: 2 years full time or 3 years part-time (Halesowen College only).

 

Teaching staff

You will be taught by a teaching team whose expertise and knowledge are closely matched to the content of the modules on the course. The team includes senior academics and professional practitioners with relevant education experience. Teaching is based on research and co-construction with learners. Many of the course lecturers have a higher education teaching qualification or are Fellows or Senior Fellows of the Higher Education Academy. You can learn more about the staff by visiting our staff profiles page. 

Assessment

The course provides opportunities to test understanding and learning informally through the completion of practice or 'formative' assignments. Each module has one or more formal or 'summative' assessments, which are graded and count towards the overall module grade.

Assessment methods include:

  • Written assignments
  • Individual and group presentations
  • Case studies
  • Reflective portfolio entries
  • Problem based learning
  • Learning journals / reflective journals
  • Seminars
  • Independent Studies
  • Workplace investigations
  • Self-evaluation / needs analysis
  • Evaluations of processes and resources
  • Poster/leaflet presentations /Production of workplace resources
  • Literature critiques

The precise assessment requirements for an individual student in an academic year will vary according to the modules studied, but a typical summative assessment pattern for each year of the course is:

Level 4

  • 2 Learning portfolios
  • 2 evaluation and annotation of an educational resource
  • 4 essays
  • 1 critical evaluation
  • 1 reflective commentary
  • 1 group presentation

Level 5

  • 3 essays
  • 1 ethics report
  • 1 workplace study plan
  • 1 professional enquiry
  • 1 learning journal
  • 1 group presentation
  • 2 reflective commentaries

You will receive feedback on formative assessments and on summative assessments. Feedback is intended to support learning and you are encouraged to discuss it with personal academic tutors and module tutors as appropriate.

We will provide you with feedback on summative assessments within 20 working days of hand-in dates.

Careers

Where could it take you?

Employability

The FD in Teaching and Learning Support leads into a range of potential career paths including teaching, academic support and work with students with additional needs. Our graduates have an excellent employment record, with the majority going on to work in educational settings. As well as going on to become successful teachers other students move into areas such as learning support, child mentoring and welfare, and become training officers in the private sector. 

A foundation degree is a nationally recognised qualification which may support progression within your current learning support role. The course provides a sound basis for further study at Bachelors degree level including progression to the BA (Hons) Education Studies Top-up or BA (Hons) Teaching in Primary Education with recommendation for Qualified Teacher Status (Top Up).

Two students are walkng next to each other and smiling

Careers and Employability

Our Graduates pursue exciting and diverse careers in a wide variety of employment sectors.

Find out how we can support you to achieve your potential.
Costs

How much will it cost?

Full-time tuition fees

UK and EU students

The standard fee for full-time home and EU undergraduate students enrolling on BA/BSc/LLB degrees and FdA/FdSc degrees in the 2023/24 academic year is £9,250 per year.

For more details, please visit our course fees page.

International students

The standard tuition fee for full-time international students enrolling on BA/BSc/LLB degrees and FdA/FdSc degrees in the 2023/24 academic year is £14,700 per year.

For more details, please visit our course fees page.

Part-time tuition fees

UK and EU students

The standard tuition fees for part-time UK and EU students registering on this course in the academic year 2023/24 are £1,156 per 15-credit module, £1,542 per 20-credit module, £2,312 per 30-credit module, £3,083 per 40-credit module, £3,469 per 45-credit module and £4,625 per 60 credit module.

For more details, please visit our course fees page.

Additional costs

Every course has day-to-day costs for basic books, stationery, printing and photocopying. The amounts vary between courses.

As this course requires it, you will need to pay for an Enhanced Disclosure & Barring Service (DBS) check.

You are required to be volunteering or employed in a learning support, or similar, role for the duration of the course. The expectation is that you make arrangements to attend your employment or voluntary work and meet any travel costs.

How to apply