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Worcester's 'Dynamic Environment' Praised by Newly-Appointed Academic GP Trainee

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The University of Worcester is the perfect place for students to prepare themselves for a career in the medical professions, according to new Lecturer in Clinical Education and Primary Care, Dr Duncan Shrewsbury.

Dr Shrewsbury has recently been appointed by the Institute of Health and Society as part of an academic General Practitioner training post, which sees him divide his time between the University and seeing patients at a GP surgery in Redditch.

During his three years at the University, Dr Shrewsbury will develop programmes around Primary Care and Clinical Education, helping the University to enhance its postgraduate courses and programme of research.

He explains: “During GP training, you are given the opportunity to divide your time if you are awarded an exceptional academic opportunity, which is what this post at Worcester represents.

“This involves a fifty – fifty split between working in a surgery, where I see patients in the mornings and afternoons some days, and working at the University others. My responsibilities here include developing the portfolio of postgraduate courses and the programme of research.

“I will be working on the new Physician Associate programme, as well as developing other level seven (postgraduate) programmes.”

The recruitment of Dr Shrewsbury is the University of Worcester’s first academic GP appointment, and he believes that the University’s resources, facilities and outstanding reputation in the deliverance of Health and Society courses make it the perfect place at which students at all stages of their professional development can thrive.

“The medical profession can get siloed very easily,” he says. “This isn’t good for research, for training, for professional development, and most importantly of all, for patients. There shouldn’t be that disconnect there.

“The environment here at Worcester reinforces the cross-disciplinary aspect of our practice, and allows you to build on your understanding of other disciplines. This means students can get a much stronger idea of how to work in an environment which can sometimes be nebulous and confusing.

“It’s a very dynamic environment, and in terms of my personal development, it presents a unique opportunity to gain experience as a leader in a truly interdisciplinary educational context in research and practice – something which I hope to take on to improve the educational experience of doctors and other healthcare professionals.”

Dr Shrewsbury is currently working towards an EdD (Doctorate of Education) in Special Educational Needs at the University of Exeter. Previously, he gained his primary medical qualification and a degree in Neuroscience from the University of Birmingham, and an MSc in Medical Education from Staffordshire University.

He has taught A-level Biology and developed mindfulness and mentoring within healthcare organisations in the West Midlands, East Midlands and London. He has recently been named by the Health Service Journal as an LGBT role model within the NHS.