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How can journalism rebuild its reputation in the wake of the phone hacking scandal?

Claire Wolfe, Principal Lecturer in Journalism at the University of Worcester, speaks up for the profession in the wake of the damaging phone hacking scandal, and the subsequent conviction of former News of the World editor, Andy Coulson.

Read the full opinion by Claire Wolfe

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  • How can journalism rebuild its reputation in the wake of the phone hacking scandal?

    Claire Wolfe, Principal Lecturer in Journalism at the University of Worcester, speaks up for the profession in the wake of the damaging phone hacking scandal, and the subsequent conviction of former News of the World editor, Andy Coulson.

    “The conviction of Andy Coulson is significant on a number of fronts; it has confirmed that the bad practice of phone hacking was being sanctioned at a high level and has thrown the spotlight on the practise of spin doctoring. But probably most damning, is the impression given that journalism is all sleaze and deception. The wrong-doings are confined to a small, though powerful, minority of publications.

    “Most publications, and that includes the huge swathe of regional newspapers, have always abided by both laws (and phone hacking is a breach of criminal laws) and voluntary codes of conduct. They may sometimes fall foul of a breach in guidelines, often through processing vast amounts of material at speed than through poor judgement, but corrections have followed and there has been a tacit understanding that to improve trust within journalism, accuracy, balance and fairness are hugely important.

    “The vast majority of news stories are accurate, interesting to their audiences and well balanced.”

    Claire Wolfe Subject Leader, Journalism | 25 June 2014

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